Monday, 22 October 2018

Coloured Diamonds

The most valuable fancy colours are those with a single colour. They are difficult to find because they often have secondary colours. Grading a fancy colour is rigorous because they don't have the same number of points on a colour scale.

When a fancy-coloured diamond is under evaluation, the GIA focuses on three areas:Hue - The colour (e.g. purplish-pink), Tone - How light or dark the colour is, and Strength/Saturation.
Less than one in 10,000 gem-quality diamonds is classified as ‘fancy-coloured’. The various colours are formed under unique conditions involving specific trace elements, radiation and/or plastic deformation of the crystal structure.
Fancy yellow and browns are more abundant. Rarest is the red diamond. Classified according to their hue, tone and saturation, the value of coloured stones generally increases with the strength and purity of the colour. Even very slight colour differences can have a profound effect on price.

Sunday, 21 October 2018

Blue Garnets

Garnets are a group of silicate minerals that have been used since the Bronze Age as gemstones and abrasives. All garnets possess similar physical properties and crystal forms, but differ in chemical composition. The different species are pyrope, almandine, spessartine, grossular, uvarovite and andradite.

Garnet is available in a plethora of colours and is found around the world. Rarest and most valuable of all are blue garnets. They were discovered in 1998 in Bekily, Southern Madagascar. They are actually colour change garnets, appearing blue under fluorescent light changing to reddish-purple under incandescent light. The color change is pronounced and these rare garnets have become highly sought after by collectors.
Color change garnets are due in part to varying concentrations of vanadium and chromium. The blue-green to purple color change garnets have relatively high concentrations of vanadium and low concentrations of chromium.

Very fine, gem quality blue garnets over 10 carats are scarce and valuable.

Friday, 19 October 2018

Ammolite

Ammolite is an opal-like organic gemstone found primarily along the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains of North America. It is made of the fossilized shells of ammonites, which in turn are composed primarily of aragonite, the same mineral that makes up nacreous pearls.

It is one of the few biogenic gemstones; others include amber, pearl and coral.
The ammonites that form ammolite inhabited a prehistoric, inland subtropical sea that bordered the Rocky Mountains. This area is known today as the Cretaceous or Western Interior Seaway. As the seas receded, the ammonites were buried by layers of bentonite sediment.

This sediment preserved the aragonite of their shelled remains, preventing it from converting to calcite.
An iridescent opal-like play of colour is shown in fine examples, mostly in shades of green and red although all the spectral colors are possible.

Iridescence is due to the microstructure of the aragonite: unlike most other gems, whose colors come from light absorption, the iridescent color of ammolite comes from interference with the light that rebounds from stacked layers of thin platelets that make up the aragonite.
The thicker the layers, the more reds and greens are produced; the thinner the layers, the more blues and violets.

Tuesday, 16 October 2018

Uber Bling Watches

High-jewelry watches represent the haute couture of horology. Extravagant and always exceedingly expensive, these divas elicit oohs and ahs by fusing two luxury worlds with abandon: They’re statement pieces that do more than just look fabulous — they actually tell the time, too.
Bvlgari


Graff

Chopard
Jaeger-LeCoultre Dior
Van Cleef & Arpels
Jacob & Co
FabergéCartier

Monday, 15 October 2018

Chopard Red Carpet jewels shine

Chopard is synonymous with the Cannes Film Festival. The Festival is Chopard's single most important event.

Sunday, 14 October 2018

Van Cleef & Arpels - Oiseaux de Paradis

It all started with the marriage of Estelle Arpels and Alfred van Cleef in 1895. In 1906 they started to work under one name: Van Cleef & Arpels. Today it is a household name for the finest gems on earth.