Friday, 18 August 2017

Diaspore a part of the National Gem Collection

In 2014 two large, rare color-changing diaspore gemstones were donated to the Smithsonian Institution’s National Gem Collection, thanks to Milenyum Mining Ltd.

The Dubai-based miner donated the stones, a 44.48-carat faceted oval-shaped diaspore and a 159.33-carat cat’s eye cabochon diaspore, at the American Gem Trade Association’s GemFair.
Diaspore is a naturally color-changing gem, and is mined at only one source, the Anatolia Mountains of Turkey. Milenyum is the only company that mines the gemstone.

Zultanite and Csarite are trade names.
Diaspore is a durable gemstone with a hardness of 6.5 – 7 on the MOHS scale. Since Diaspore has perfect cleavage in one direction it can be difficult to cut because parts of the stone will cleave off.

Typical loss cutting rough diaspore is 98 percent. This makes large gemstones extremely rare and valuable.
“To our knowledge, currently there are fewer than 20 faceted csarite gemstones in the world that have a weight of 40 carats and above. Given the rarity of this unusual gem, we feel the Smithsonian’s National Gem Collection is a fitting home for two of the few examples available in this size and quality,” said Milenyum Mining President Murat Akgun.

The National Gem Collection is housed at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington.

Thursday, 17 August 2017

Diamond Necklace with a beating heart

New York-based Paul Forrest Co. is bringing jewellery to life with a diamond-encrusted necklace that’s built with its very own beating heart. The action of the beating heart is controlled by a mechanical movement similar to that found in a watch.

The mainspring, which is wound by a tiny key, powers a chain of trains, levers and wheels that drive the beating halves in the pendant, slowly moving back and forth to create the illusion of a beating heart.
The movements are all made in Switzerland, with price points ranging from $19,000 to $45,000.

Customers can personalize their pendants with a selection of diamonds or gemstones.

Wednesday, 16 August 2017

Cartier - Modern Brilliance

Cartier tours the world’s museums, showing off roughly 1,500 pieces it has amassed for its archive. Cartier started its collection in 1983. The French jewelry house’s 27th exhibition was called “Brilliant: Cartier in the 20th Century”


One 'Carrot' Diamond found after 13 years

An 84-year-old lost her diamond engagement ring in September 2004 while gardening. Despite searching the farm thoroughly, Mary Grams couldn’t find the ring, given to her in 1951. “I cried for I don’t know how many days,” she said. Grams eventually settled for a replacement ring -- a cheaper alternative -- and told no one but her son. She said her late husband never noticed the difference.

The band was eventually found by Mary's daughter-in-law, who now lives on the farm with her husband. She was pulling carrots when she saw one was encircled with the engagement ring.

Tuesday, 15 August 2017

Purple pyrope-almandine garnets

In early 2016 purple garnets from East Africa started to appear in the Bangkok market. The source was Manica Province in central Mozambique. The deposit is located about 60 km northeast of Chimoio, near Gorongosa National Park. The area is under the control of the Mozambican National Resistance (RENAMO), an armed rebel group.
What's special about these garnets is the color - an intense purple with red flashes that is called Royal Purple. The Mozambique material has strong color with extreme brilliance.

If this wasn't enough, the garnets also display a color change, from grape under daylight to cranberry with magenta flashes under incandescent lighting.

The government of Mozambique has now closed the area to mining making further supply uncertain.
The material with the best color is found in smaller sizes, under 3-4 carats. Since the color saturation is so intense, larger stones are too dark. The highest grade material has come from the Mozambique deposit, with some stones coming from Tanzania. Both display the distinctive color change.

Top Investment Gemstones

Investing in gemstones is not for everyone. Rare gems do have a very good history of increasing in value over time. When other assets are declining and currency is losing its value, gemstones tend to be a reliable store of value. They are compact, portable and private.
While gemstones are not as liquid as some investments, a high quality gem will retain its value. In general the world demand for fine gemstones far exceeds the supply, and gemstone prices mainly move upward over time.
Fine ruby is the rarest of all colored gems, and Burmese ruby has long been the premier investment gem. Fine unheated Burmese rubies in larger sizes draw large prices. Vivid red, known in the trade as pigeon's blood, is the most valuable color. Rubies tend to have inclusions, so intensity of color is more important than perfect clarity.

Burma rubies are by far the most valuable, but fine unheated rubies from other locations such as Madagascar, Mozambique and Tanzania are increasing in value.
Blue sapphire is the second most popular colored stone for investment. The rarest and most valuable sapphires are from Kashmir, but no new material has been mined there in more than a century.

Next most valuable is Burma sapphire, followed by stones from Ceylon and Madagascar. Fancy color sapphires, yellow, pink and padpardascha are becoming more popular with investors.
The emerald market has seen turmoil as a result of treatments with artificial resins, but fine, untreated emeralds continue to be reliable investments. Colombian emeralds, especially in larger sizes, continue to be the most valuable, followed by the best Brazilian emeralds.

Some high quality emeralds are also being mined in Zambia. Investment grade emeralds must be untreated.
Spinel is a relative newcomer as an investment gem. The most valuable spinel colors are red, hot pink and flame orange. Red Burmese spinels and the neon pink-red spinels from Mahenge, Tanzania have the best investment potential.

Spinel is completely untreated and prices on fine pieces have risen significantly in the last 5 years.
Tsavorite Garnet is a rare gem that has begun to challenge emerald as the finest of the green gemstones. Unlike emerald, tsavorite is always untreated. It has more brilliance than emerald due to its higher refractive index.

Tsavorite garnets over 2 carats are very rare, and fine stones over 4 carats are exceptionally rare. Colors range from mint green to a deep chrome green.
Spessartite Garnet is a bright orange garnet colored by manganese. The finest examples, referred to as Mandarin Garnet, are a pure orange that is one of the most vivid colors in the gemstone world.

Pure orange specimens are very rare. They come mainly from Nigeria and Namibia. Large, clean stones are valuable and display a remarkable brilliance.
Alexandrite is a rare chrysoberyl that is popular with collectors for its striking color change and excellent hardness (8.5 on the Mohs scale).

Alexandrite was first discovered in Russia. The highest quality alexandrite comes from Brazil, with medium grade material from Tanzania.
Fine translucent emerald-green jadeite is known as Imperial Jade. This rare gem is found mainly in Burma (Myanmar) and is coveted by collectors around the world, especially in Asia.

Type A jadeite is untreated natural Burmese jadeite where the color is 100% natural. Only certified jadeite of this quality is deemed worthy of investment.
The rarest topaz known is called Imperial topaz and its sole source is the Ouro PrĂȘto area in Minas Gerais, Brazil. This topaz is golden-orange to orange to pink, pinkish-red or violet in color.

The color must be completely natural, with no enhancement by heat or other methods. Stones with a hint of pink or red are the most valuable, with a pure red natural topaz counting as extraordinary.
Paraiba tourmaline is a rare copper-bearing variety of tourmaline with a distinctive neon-like glow. It was first discovered in the Brazilian state of Paraiba in 1989. Since then small deposits have been found in Nigeria and Mozambique.

The Brazilian paraiba remains the most valuable, but color and clarity are more important than origin for these rare gems. Clean paraiba tourmalines with vivid color are the most valuable.
When buying gemstones for investment, it is critical to buy top grade gems. Low cost commercial grade stones are worthless to the investor. Fine gemstones are distinguished by vivid, intense color, outstanding clarity, and excellent cut. Buy the best, it is money invested, not spent.