Monday, 31 October 2016

Tiffany & Co - The Blue Book

Tiffany & Co was founded by Charles Lewis Tiffany and John B. Young in New York City in 1837 as a "stationery and fancy goods emporium", the store initially sold a wide variety of stationery items, and operated as "Tiffany, Young and Ellis" in Lower Manhattan.

The name was shortened to Tiffany & Company in 1853 when Charles Tiffany took control and established the firm's emphasis on jewelry.
Tiffany & Co. operates jewelry and specialty retail stores and manufactures products. The Company operates retail stores and boutiques in the Americas, Asia-Pacific and Europe. The Company’s principal product category is jewelry, which represented 90% of worldwide sales.

The Company also sells timepieces, leather goods, sterling silver goods, china, crystal, stationery, fragrances and accessories, which represented 8% of worldwide sales in 2012.

For over 175 years, Tiffany & Co. has produced world-renowned jewelry collections.
Tiffany’s celebrated Blue Book is an annual publication that showcases the latest and most spectacular jewels, and has been arriving in customers’ mail boxes since 1845. It is the first mail order catalogue in the U.S.

Saturday, 29 October 2016

"Ratnaraj" Ruby headlines Christie's Sale

An array of Burmese rubies, Kashmir sapphires and colored diamonds will cross the block at Christie’s November auction. Headlining is the Ratnaraj ruby, a 10.05-carat Burmese “pigeon’s blood” ruby. It is estimated at $8.8-million to $12.5-million.

 “Ratnaraj” means “king of precious stones” in Sanskrit.
5.01-carat Burmese ruby

16.36-carat Kashmir sapphire

7.93-carat fancy pink diamond

4.26-carat fancy blue diamond

Friday, 28 October 2016

Jadeite

Jadeite is a pyroxene mineral with composition NaAlSi2O6. It is monoclinic and has a Mohs hardness of about 6.5 to 7.0 depending on the composition.

The Latin version of the name, lapis nephriticus, is the origin of the term nephrite, another variety of jade. Jadeite is formed in metamorphic rocks under high pressure and relatively low temperature. In all well-documented occurrences, jadeitite appears to have formed from subduction zone fluids in association with serpentinite.

Jadeite from the Motagua Valley, Guatemala, was used by the Olmec and Maya, as well as the indigenous peoples of Costa Rica.

Typically, the most highly valued colors of jadeite are the most intensely green, translucent varieties, though traditionally white has been considered the most valuable of the jades by the Chinese.

Natural Icy Imperial Emerald Green Jadeite Dragon's Fang Pendant 16 carats.
Top-quality jadeite is very rare. Vivid, sleek, and translucent, magnificent jadeite commands some of the highest prices among gems in today’s international market. Jadeite’s three most important qualities, in order of their impact on its market value, are color, transparency, and texture.

The finest-quality jadeite is known as Imperial jade. The royal court of China once had a standing order for all available material of this kind, and it’s one of the world’s most expensive gems.

The Hutton-Mdivani necklace by Cartier sold for $27.4 million, a world record for a Cartier jewel.

Jadeite and diamond pendant £180k
Jadeite’s transparency ranges from opaque to semitransparent. The best jadeite is semitransparent. The finest-quality jadeite is usually cut into cabochons.

A jadeite snuff bottle, 1780–1880. It sold for HK$ 1.5 million

A pair of jadeite and diamond ear pendants. Est HK$3,800,000-5,800,000 ($480,000-750,000)

A magnificent jadeite ring. Est HK$28,000,000-38,000,000 ($3,500,000-4,800,000)

Art-deco jadeite, enamel, gem-set and diamond brooch from Cartier, circa 1927. HK$7,000,000-8,000,000

Jadite Bangle. HK$6,000,000 – HK$8,000,000 ($777,816 - $1,037,088)


Thursday, 27 October 2016

Violet Diamonds

Pure violet diamonds without secondary modifying colors are impossibly rare, perhaps even rarer than purple diamonds. The presence of the trace element hydrogen in the atomic lattice is responsible for violet diamonds while purple diamonds are caused by plastic deformation. Violet diamonds and purple diamonds therefore consist of two separate colors.

Some industry professionals use the words “violet” and “purple” interchangeably. Violet diamonds are a distinct color group. Violet diamonds will appear more blue-grey to the eye while purple diamonds appear red or pinkish.

Fancy violet diamonds are assessed according to intensity of color, or a combination of saturation and tone. The more intense a diamond’s color saturation, the more it will be worth.

They are graded as follows: Fancy Violet, Fancy Intense Violet, Fancy Deep Violet and Fancy Dark Violet.
Violet diamonds of any kind are typically small and very rarely exceed one carat.
Natural fancy violet diamonds are extremely valuable. Even more valuable are those that are a pure violet color without any secondary modifying color. Modifying colors tend to devalue violet diamonds, but they are still exceptionally rare and will always be highly valued.

The Argyle Violet
The Argyle Violet, a 2.83 oval shaped violet diamond, is the dazzling centerpiece of the 2016 Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender. It is the largest violet diamond ever recovered from the Argyle mine.

Just 12 carats of polished violet diamonds have come from the Argyle mine over 32 years of mining.

The rough gem originally weighed 9.17 carats.

Wednesday, 26 October 2016

Gray Diamonds

A combination of black and white, gray is a non-spectral color. In their purest forms, gray color diamonds come quite close to colorless stones.

Among colored diamonds, gray diamonds are relatively unknown. This may be due to their extreme rarity. Far more rare than yellow and brown diamonds, gray diamonds are in the lower range of fancy colored diamonds prices ... their pricing is so attractive that they can be considered an alternative to white colorless diamonds based on price.
Most gray colored diamonds get their color due to a high concentration of hydrogen, and rarely boron like blue diamonds.
In the niche of gray diamonds, there are nearly endless options. The human eye can distinguish up to 500 shades of gray and this is probably the number of gray diamond colors there are.

Gray diamonds are graded in the following intensity levels: Light Gray, Fancy Light Gray, Fancy Gray, Fancy Dark Gray, and Fancy Deep Gray.


The most common color modifiers according to the GIA are yellowish, greenish, bluish and violet.


Fancy Dark Violet Gray Diamond

There are few notable gray diamonds because they barely exist. However, two of the most famous diamonds in the world are blue diamonds with a gray modifier (gray blue diamonds): the Hope Diamond and the Wittelsbach Diamond (until Graff re-polished it to a pure blue).

The most famous gray colored diamond is the Sultan of Morocco. The diamond has a cushion cut, a blue hue and weighs 35.27 carats.