Thursday, 1 December 2016

Star Ruby - Star Sapphire

Star rubies and star sapphires display a six-ray star that seems to glide across the surface of the gem when moved. This six-ray star is caused due to an optical phenomena known as "asterism".

The term is derived from the Greek word "aster", which means star, so asterism is commonly referred to as "star" or "star-effect". Other popular gemstones that display asterism are rose quartz, garnet, diopside, moonstone, spinel and opal.
Black Star Sapphires with golden stars are one of the most fascinating forms of sapphire. Black star sapphires differ from other colours of star sapphires because the star is formed not due to rutile silk but due to hematite plates.
The Delong Star Ruby resides in the Natural History Museum in New York City. Weighing 100.32 carats, it is a purplish red stone from Burma.

The Rosser Reeves Star Ruby; a fine-quality star ruby of 138.70 carats from Sri Lanka.
Star of Asia A round six-ray star sapphire weighing 329.7 carats. The stone's origin is Burma, and it's part of the Smithsonian Museum's collection.

Weighing 27.62 carats, the Star of Bharany Ruby is one of the world’s finest star rubies.
Traditionally, star rubies were worn by knights in the battlefields to protect themselves from the enemy. Local tales in Karnataka (India) say that if it is worn as a visible pendant or as a headgear then anyone who faces you as an enemy looses half his valour.

The power of star ruby is said to be the highest during full moon.